What does Oregon budget for Veterans (Oregon Dept. of Veteran Affairs)?

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS

Agency Totals

2013-15

Actual

2015-17

Legislatively Approved

2017-19

Current Service Level

2017-19

Legislatively Adopted

General Fund 9,678,902 13,007,966 11,066,613 8,380,599
Lottery Funds 14,856,025
Other Funds 45,304,442 85,405,620 86,784,284 113,266,941
Other Funds (NL) 186,154,228 373,333,710 387,546,159 387,546,159
Federal Funds 40,000 4,452,891 500,000
Total Funds $241,177,572 $476,200,187 $485,397,056 $524,549,724
Positions 84 88 88 96
FTE 82.63 87.76 88.00 95.84

Overview

The mission of the Oregon Department of Veteran’s Affairs (ODVA) is to serve and honor veterans through leadership, advocacy, and strong partnerships. ODVA has three primary program areas that are supported by the agency’s core operations:

  1. the Veterans’ Loan Program,
  2. the Veterans’ Services Program, and the
  3. Oregon Veterans’ Home Program.

The Veterans’ Loan Program, funded entirely with Other Funds, provides home loans to qualified veterans. Loan origination and servicing functions, as well as the agency’s administration costs, are included in the Loan Program budget.

The Veterans’ Services Program provides claims and appeals assistance, conservatorship services, and partnerships with counties and national veterans’ service organizations to assist veterans. The Veterans’ Services Program is primarily funded through a combination of General Fund and Lottery Funds.

The Oregon Veterans’ Home Program operates skilled nursing and memory care facilities in The Dalles and Lebanon. The operational costs of the facilities are funded with Other Funds from resident-related income.

Revenue Sources and Relationships

Other Funds revenues for the Veterans’ Loan Program are derived from the proceeds of general obligation bond sales ($240 million), veteran loan and contract-related repayments ($86 million), and interest earnings ($53 million).

The balance of revenue comes from service charges, rent, licenses, fees, and miscellaneous revenues totaling approximately $4.3 million. Available revenues and reserves are expected to be sufficient to cover operations and necessary debt service. The Home Loan Program’s administrative costs are limited in the budget, while the direct loan activity expenditures (i.e., loans made to veterans, pass-through payments made on behalf of borrowers, and debt service paid on general obligation bonds issued to finance the program) are nonlimited.

The Veterans’ Services Program has historically been funded with General Fund and Other Funds primarily generated from conservatorship fees. Beginning in the 2017-19 biennium, the Veterans’ Services Program funding includes Lottery Funds available through the passage of Measure 96, which dedicated 1.5% of state lottery net proceeds towards veterans’ services. Total lottery revenue dedicated to veterans’ services is projected to be $19.1 million for the 2017-19 biennium based on the Office of Economic Analysis’ May 2017 revenue forecast with adjustments for administrative actions. Lottery revenues will be allocated to the Department for the Lottery Funds expenditure limitation included in the Department’s budget, with the balance being retained in the constitutionally dedicated Veterans’ Services Fund.

Collectively, General Fund and Lottery Funds support ODVA’s statewide veteran services, including Veteran Service Officer positions, a small emergency assistance program, and service delivery partnership programs, where funding is passed through as special payments to counties and national service organizations. Lottery Funds directly support a veterans’ crisis support and suicide prevention telephone hotline, veteran volunteer program, veterans’ services grant fund, and grants to public universities and community colleges for campus veteran resource centers.

In addition to General Fund and Lottery Funds support, the Conservatorship program receives Other Funds revenue from fees charged to manage the finances of conservatorship clients (7% of the protected person’s income). Conservatorship fee income in the 2017-19 biennium is estimated to total approximately $920,000.

The Oregon Veterans’ Home Program operational costs are financed entirely with Other Funds. Revenues are primarily moneys received from the residents of the facilities, Medicare and Medicaid payments, and a per diem amount received directly from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Veterans who reside in the Homes receive benefits not available to them if they reside elsewhere. Many veterans receive aid and attendant benefits along with disability compensation or income-based VA pensions, which, combined with their social security benefits, provides the revenue with which to pay for their care in the Homes. Home Program charges for services are estimated to total $85.4 million in the 2017-19 biennium. The total amount of revenue is based, in part, on occupancy projections from the Homes’ contractor.

Other Funds revenue is also received from the sale of veterans’ license plates through the Department of Motor Vehicles and the Charitable Check Off program. ODVA projects a 2017-19 beginning balance of $11.5 million in the Veterans’ Home Program. Cash reserves will be used during the biennium for working capital, capital improvements, match for The Dalles Veterans’ Home federal renovation grant, and held for contingencies.

Budget Environment

An estimated 310,333 veterans live in Oregon who have served over the following five eras:

  • World War II (5.5%),
  • Korea (8.1%),
  • Vietnam (37.5%),
  • Gulf/Post 9-11 (25.6%), and
  • during times of peace (23.3%).

ODVA continues to focus on serving more veterans and reaching the seven out of ten veterans who are not accessing their federal benefits for education, health care, disability, or retirement. Additionally, over 50% of veterans are 65 or older, placing an emphasis on the need for aging veteran services.

The Veterans’ Home Loan program is funded through the issuance of tax-exempt Qualified Veteran Mortgage Bonds (QVMBs). Federal law limits the use of QVMBs, requiring that borrowers must apply for a loan within 25 years of discharge from military service and that proceeds may not be used to refinance homes. In 2010, Oregon voters passed Measure 70, making the Home Loan Program a state lifetime benefit for veterans. Loans for this eligible group must be funded from reserves or older bond proceeds. Oregon and the four other states with veterans’ home loan programs (California, Texas, Wisconsin, and Alaska) are seeking federal legislation to ease this restriction. While more veterans are eligible, and the product to serve them is restricted, reserves from the loan program have subsidized costs of the veterans’ services and administrative functions of the Department.

In response to a General Fund shortfall in the 1991-93 biennium, Veterans’ Home Loan Program revenues were used to supplement veterans’ services funding. This practice was a contributing factor to losses and a decrease in the overall net position of the Home Loan Program over the last six years. A portion of the subsidy was eliminated in the 2013-15 biennium when the cost of Veteran Service Officer positions performing non-loan program work was shifted back to General Fund. The remaining $4.1 million of veterans’ services and administration costs being supported by home loan revenues are shifted to Lottery Funds in the 2017-19 budget. Eliminating the subsidization of veterans’ services program activities will help to strengthen, stabilize, and sustain the Home Loan Program for future generations of veterans.

The recession and bursting of the real estate bubble, low conventional mortgage rates, and the inability to refinance significantly decreased ODVA’s home loan originations and outstanding portfolio. Over the past two biennia, as the economy has recovered, the demand for veteran home loans has continued to increase. However, this growth is limited by low housing inventory and rising prices. As of June 30, 2017, the loan portfolio was approximately 1,870 loans totaling $296 million.

Expenditures for the Oregon Veterans’ Homes relate to the cost of providing residential care. Operation of the facilities is contracted out to a health care service provider. Obtaining and maintaining a high occupancy rate is important to each facility’s financial condition. A second Veterans’ Home was opened in the City of Lebanon (Linn County) in the fall of 2014. Construction of a third home in Roseburg was reauthorized in 2017, with Article XI-Q general obligation bond proceeds set aside to fund a portion of the non-federal match obligation.

Legislatively Adopted Budget

The 2017-19 legislatively adopted budget for the Department of Veterans’ Affairs is $524.5 million total funds and 96 positions (95.84 FTE), which is a 10.2% increase over the 2015-17 legislatively approved budget.

Other Funds Nonlimited of $387.5 million for the Veterans’ Loan program bond-related activities, debt service, and loans to borrowers make up 74% of the total budget. Excluding Nonlimited funds, the 2017-19 legislatively adopted budget is a 33.2% increase over the 2015-17 legislatively approved budget.

Lottery Funds expenditure limitation of $14.9 million, available to the Department beginning in the 2017-19 biennium through the passage of Measure 96, is included in the budget. The budget also includes a $8.4 million of General Fund, which consists of $7.4 million for veterans’ services and $1 million for debt service on outstanding bonds.

Loan Program

2013-15

Actual

2015-17

Legislatively Approved

2017-19

Current Service Level

2017-19

Legislatively Adopted

Other Funds 11,214,580 15,899,349 17,131,485 16,417,830
Other Funds (NL) 186,154,228 373,333,710 387,546,159 387,546,159
Total Funds $197,368,808 $389,233,059 $404,677,644 $403,963,989
Positions 50 51 51 46
FTE 50.10 51.10 51.10 46.00

Program Description

The Veterans’ Home Loan Program was created in 1945 to provide a benefit to World War II veterans returning home. The Loan Program provides qualified veterans low-interest rate mortgages on single-family owner- occupied homes through the issuance of general obligation bonds authorized under Article XI-A of the Oregon Constitution. Since the Loan Program’s inception, the Department has made over 335,000 home and farm loans with a principal amount of over $7.9 billion. The program budget consists of:

  • Director’s Office – policy, public information, and communications

 

  • Veterans’ Home Loan Services – functions dealing with the loan program, including originating and servicing loans.

 

  • Financial Services – overall financial oversight of the Department, including budgeting, accounting, cashiering, and financial management.

 

  • Support Services – human resource services, information services, and facility services.

Legislatively Adopted Budget

The 2017-19 legislatively adopted budget of $404 million Other Funds is a 3.8% increase from the 2015-17 legislatively approved budget.

Other Funds Nonlimited of $387.5 million for loans to veterans ($155 million), expenditures related to making loans and issuing bonds ($13 million), and debt service ($219.5 million) make up 96% of the program budget. Limited Other Funds of $16.4 million for loan services and ODVA operations is a 3.3% increase from the 2015-17 legislatively approved budget.

This increase is net of a reduction of $1.7 million to shift funding for six veterans’ services positions (6.10 FTE) and associated services and supplies from Other Funds supported by home loan revenues to Lottery Funds in the Veterans’ Services Program.

Shifting the costs of veterans’ services activities to Lottery Funds is expected to strengthen and stabilize the Home Loan Program. The following Other Funds increases were also approved:

  • $933,333 on a one-time basis to refresh the Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ office building, including replacing the carpet, painting the walls, and updating exterior and interior signage.

 

  • $250,000 to purchase and install a home loan system that combines loan origination and servicing into one application, creating efficiencies and reducing errors. The new software system will also allow veterans to review home loan information online.

 

  • $201,359 to establish a quality assurance and compliance coordinator (QA/CC) position (1.00 FTE) and reclassify two existing Loan Specialist positions. The QA/CC position will maintain oversight and compliance with federal and state regulations, including new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) rules.

Reclassification of the Loan Specialists supports the increased responsibilities of these positions to comply with the new Dodd-Frank and CFPB regulations for loan origination.

Veterans’ Services Program

2013-15

Actual

2015-17

Legislatively Approved

2017-19

Current Service Level

2017-19

Legislatively Adopted

General Fund 9,180,431 10,389,026 10,049,290 7,363,276
Lottery Funds 14,856,025
Other Funds 716,041 930,312 1,028,087 107,623
Federal Funds 40,000 1,150,000 500,000
Total Funds $9,936,472 $12,469,338 $11,077,377 $22,826,924
Positions 30 32 32 45
FTE 29.40 31.66 31.90 44.84

Program Description

The Veterans’ Services Program provides advocacy and benefits to veterans, their dependents, and survivors through the following activities:

  • Statewide Veteran Services – Assists veterans, their dependents, and survivors to obtain service-connected and non-service related benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Federally accredited and state certified veteran service officers (VSOs) provide claims and appellate representation through ODVA’s power of attorney. In 2016, ODVA received 11,842 new powers of attorney, and currently holds power of attorney for nearly 101,000 veterans. Over 79,000 active claims were filed in fiscal years 2015 and 2016. This program also provides training, certification, and accreditation for county and state VSOs.

 

  • County Veteran Service Officers Program (CVSOs) – Pass-through funding to counties that supports a network of trained county veteran service officers. This partnership began in 1947 to aid counties in promoting veteran services at the local level. Prior to the 2017-19 biennium, CVSOs have existed in 34 of the 36 counties and ODVA provided services for Marion and Polk counties. However, a Polk County Veteran Service Office was established in January 2017 and ODVA expects Marion County to open a Veteran Service Office in 2018.

 

  • National Service Organizations (NSOs) – Pass-through funding supports national veteran service officers that provide benefit and claims representation. ODVA’s partnership with national veteran service organizations in Oregon was established in 1949. Currently, the Disabled American Veterans, Military Order of the Purple Heart, National Association of Black Veterans, American Legion, and Veterans of Foreign Wars participate in this funding.

 

  • Veterans’ Emergency Financial Assistance Program – Provides emergency aid to Oregon veterans and their immediate families through an emergency assistance program established by the Legislature in 2005. One- time grants are provided to help with health and welfare emergencies.

 

  • Partnerships – Leverage existing state programs and partner with federal, state, and non-profit organizations to expand services in the key areas of health, education, and economic opportunity. In the 2017 session, two new grant programs were established to expand ODVA’s partnerships. HB 2891 established a Veterans’ Services Grant fund to provide non-profits and other veterans’ organizations grants to expand services and programs that benefit veterans. SB 143 created a grant program to expand and enhance existing veteran programs on college campuses that help veterans successfully transition from military service to college life.

 

  • Aging Veteran Services – Provides conservatorship and representative payee services for veterans and their dependents who are determined to be “protected persons” and who are recipients of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ benefits. Conservatorship services are provided when no other entity or person is willing or able to act as conservator and the agency is appointed as fiduciary. The staff serves as trust officers, files required legal reports, apply for all benefits due the veteran, and counsel with families, hospital personnel, social workers, and protected persons to ensure their needs are met within the resources available. Representative payee services are more limited in scope, with staff paying bills and advocating on behalf of veterans. As of June 30, 2017, ODVA had 136 Conservatorship clients and 144 Representative Payee clients.

Legislatively Adopted Budget

The 2017-19 legislatively adopted budget of $22.8 million total funds represents an 83.1% increase from the 2015- 17 legislatively approved budget. The increase is attributable to the addition of $14.9 million Lottery Funds, available through the passage of Measure 96. General Fund support for veterans’ services is a 29.1% decrease from the prior biennium, primarily due to the shift of $2.5 million of current service level expenditures from General Fund to Lottery Funds. Additionally, $850,000 General Fund was also phased-out during development of the 2017-19 budget to remove one-time funding provided in the 2015-17 budget for a crisis and suicide prevention hotline ($350,000) and an increase to support CVSOs ($500,000).

The legislatively adopted budget makes key investments with the lottery dollars dedicated by Measure 96 to expand services to veterans, while retaining a projected $2.8 million in the constitutionally dedicated Veterans’ Services Fund to allow for fluctuations in revenue projections and provide a working capital balance. Specific investments include:

  • $4.5 million to double the current service level pass-through funding to County Veteran Service Officers and National Service 2017-19 combined General Fund and Lottery funds support for CVSOs totals $8.7 million and support for NSOs totals $236,312. Increased funding is intended to enhance exiting state and county funding, helping to serve more veterans, increase the number of claims filed, and bring more federal dollars to the state.

 

  • $4.1 million to shift the funding for veterans’ services from Other Funds supported by home loan revenues to Lottery Funds. Veterans’ services activities ($2.9 million) and the program’s share of support service costs ($1.2 million) previously funded with Loan Program revenues will be supported through Lottery Funds. Corresponding Other Funds decreases are reflected in the Veterans’ Services Program ($920,464), Loan Program ($1.7 million), and Veterans’ Home Program ($319,794).

 

  • $1.2 million to develop and implement one or more grant programs to expand and enhance existing veteran programs on college campuses that help veterans successfully transition from military service to college life, succeed in college and complete educational goals, and transition from college to the workforce (SB 143, 2017). Funding of $187,194 is provided for a Student Veterans’ Coordinator position (0.92 FTE) to administer the program and $1 million is provided on a one-biennium basis for grants to public universities and community colleges.

 

  • $600,000 to replace the conservatorship system, which will enable the Department to effectively and efficiently deliver conservatorship and representative payee services. Funding is provided for one-time development, implementation, and training costs ($400,000) and ongoing software licensing and maintenance costs ($200,000).

 

  • $555,000 to establish a grant fund for purposes that benefit veterans, including expanding outreach and services, promoting mental and physical health care, housing security, employment opportunities, education, and transportation accessibility (HB 2891, 2017).

 

  • $390,256 to establish two positions (2.00 FTE) to accommodate the increased statewide support services workload anticipated with the additional funding to CVSOs. A trainer position in the Salem Office is established to provide essential training and certification for county veteran service officers. An administrative position is established to process the increased number of claims and appeals that will be filed through the Portland ODVA office.

 

  • $380,548 to establish two positions (2.00 FTE) within the Aging Services Program. A Representative Payee position is added to accommodate the representative payee caseload and an Aging Veterans’ Outreach Specialist position is added to serve as a veteran service officer with expertise in veterans’ benefits and complex aging health care issues.

 

  • $350,000 to support a veterans’ crisis and suicide prevention hotline that offers free, anonymous assistance, 24-hours a day, to active-duty service members, veterans, and their families.

 

  • $245,509 to establish a Veteran Volunteer Coordinator position (0.92 FTE) responsible for developing and establishing a statewide veterans volunteer program that will expand outreach to veterans in their communities (HB 2908, 2017).

The 2017-19 veterans’ services budget also includes $500,000 Federal Funds in anticipation of the Transportation of Veterans in Highly Rural Areas 2017 renewal grant. ODVA has applied for and received the annual grant since the grant program was established in 2014. Grant funding is available to highly rural counties, as defined by the

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, for transportation of veterans to medical appointments. Expenditure imitation for federal grants received during the 2015-17 biennium was phased-out during development of the 2017-19 budget and ODVA will request limitation during the 2017-19 biennium for any additional grants received.

In summary, the 2017-19 legislatively adopted budget funds ongoing veterans’ services programs at the following levels:

  • Statewide Veteran Services: $4,610,421 General Fund, $3,188,534 Lottery Funds, 31.55 FTE

 

  • Aging Veteran Services: $725,428 General Fund, $2,552,990 Lottery Funds, $107,623 Other Funds, 12.37 FTE

 

  • County Veterans’ Service Officers: $1,805,571 General Fund, $6,904,151 Lottery Funds

 

  • National Service Organizations: $118,156 General Fund, $118,156 Lottery Funds

 

  • Emergency Assistance funding: $103,700 General Fund

 

  • Partnerships:
    • Campus Veteran Resource Centers grant program: $1,187,194 Lottery Funds, 0.92 FTE
    • Veterans’ Services Grant Fund: $555,000 Lottery Funds
    • Suicide Prevention Hotline: $350,000 Lottery Funds
    • Highly Rural Transportation Grant: $500,000 Federal Funds

A lottery allocation of $1.5 million was also approved to address veterans’ homelessness and housing issues. Expenditure limitation of $350,000 was provided to the Housing and Community Services Department (HCSD) for emergency housing assistance to veterans through the Emergency Housing Account program. The remaining $1.15 million is reserved pursuant to a budget note that requires ODVA and HCSD to report back to the Joint Committee on Ways and Means in February 2018 with a proposal that includes strategic investments that will result in long-term housing stability for veterans.

Oregon Veterans’ Home Program

2013-15

Actual

2015-17

Legislatively Approved

2017-19

Current Service Level

2017-19

Legislatively Adopted

General Fund 498,471 2,618,940 1,017,323 1,017,323
Other Funds 33,373,821 66,099,983 68,624,712 83,791,488
Total Funds $33,872,292 $68,718,923 $69,642,035 $84,808,811
Positions 4 5 5 5
FTE 3.13 5.00 5.00 5.00

Program Description

The Oregon Veterans’ Home Program provides skilled nursing, Alzheimer’s and memory-related, and rehabilitative care to Oregon veterans and their spouses, and to parents who have lost a child to war-time service, through two Veterans’ Homes in Oregon.

The Dalles Veterans’ Home opened in November 1997 and has a bed capacity of 151 residents. Funding for construction and equipping of the facility was from a 65% federal grant matched with a 35% state obligation contributed by Wasco County. As of June 30, 2016, The Dalles Veterans’ Home had an occupancy rate of 90%. As The Dalles Veterans’ Home enters its 20th year of operation, repairs, maintenance, and capital renewal are needed to keep the facility in good operating condition. Health and safety improvements were completed in 2011-13, and the home will undergo a renovation in the 2017-19 biennium through a federal grant approved in 2015-17.

A second Veteran’s Home in Lebanon (Linn County) opened in the autumn of 2014. The Edward C. Allworth Veterans’ Home has capacity for 154 residents who need long-term care. Skilled nursing, including inpatient rehabilitative care, is provided using a small house model, providing a home-like setting with “neighborhoods” that include landscaped courtyards and a community center. While census levels were lower as the facility began operations, as of June 30, 2016, the Lebanon Veterans’ Home was at 94% capacity.

The facilities provide care at lower-than-market rates to veterans and their families because veterans’ benefits can be utilized toward the cost of care. Home operations are funded entirely by Other Funds, consisting primarily of resident-related income, including federal VA payments, Medicare, Medicaid, insurance, and private payments. The program also receives monies from the sale of veterans’ license plates through the Department of Motor Vehicles and donations from the charitable checkoff income tax program. ODVA contracts with Veterans Care Centers of Oregon (VCCO), a non-profit organization, for the day-to-day operation of the facilities, utilizing the state’s competitive procurement process.

Legislatively Adopted Budget

The legislatively adopted budget of $84.8 million is a 23.4% increase over the 2015-17 legislatively approved budget. General Fund of $1 million is appropriated for debt service on Article XI-Q bonds issued in 2013 to fund a shortfall in the state/local share of Lebanon home construction costs that were driven by federal design requirements. Increases in Other Funds expenditure limitation for the Veterans’ Home Program include:

  • $14.9 million to address the Lebanon Veterans’ Home operating at a higher census and occupancy level sooner than originally anticipated, in addition to a higher census at The Dalles Veterans’ Home. The increase also includes updated projections for minimum wage costs.

 

  • $310,000 for costs of issuance on Article XI-Q general obligation bonds approved for capital construction projects.

 

  • $249,080 to establish an Aging Services Assistant Director (1.00 FTE) within the Veterans’ Home Program to help direct and manage the day-to-day operations of the division, including the two Oregon Veterans’ Home program directors and contractors who manage the homes.

Other Funds expenditure limitation was also decreased by $319,794 to reflect the transfer of the Aging Services Director position (1.00 FTE) to the Veterans’ Services Program. A corresponding Lottery Funds increase and position is included in the Veterans’ Services Program. The Aging Services Director is responsible for coordinating the statewide effort related to aging veterans’ services.

Capital Construction

2013-15

Actual

2015-17

Legislatively Approved

2017-19

Current Service Level

2017-19

Legislatively Adopted

Other Funds 2,475,976 12,950,000
Federal Funds 3,302,891
Total Funds $5,778,867 $12,950,000

Legislatively Adopted Budget

Capital construction expenditure limitation of $13 million was approved for the following three projects funded with the proceeds of Article XI-Q general obligation bonds:

  • $10.5 million to build a new veterans’ home in Roseburg.

 

  • $1.3 million to build a new parking lot at the Lebanon Veterans’ Home.

 

  • $1.2 million for capital improvements to The Dalles Veterans’ Home, including construction of new educational and daycare buildings, upgrades to wireless and security infrastructure, and phone system replacement.

Bonds are scheduled to be sold in spring 2019, with debt service of $2.2 million General Fund beginning in the 2019-21 biennium. Capital construction expenditure limitation for the approved projects will expire on June 30, 2023.

The 2015-17 legislatively approved budget included $3.3 million Federal Funds capital construction limitation for a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs construction grant for major renovations to The Dalles Veterans’ Home.

The federal construction grant requires a 35% state and local match ($2.5 million Other Funds approved in 2015-17), which will come from the Veterans’ Home Program cash reserves. The funds will allow for new flooring, paint, wallpaper, and ceiling tile throughout the facility; furniture replacement; remodel of the nurse stations; upgrades of all resident rooms; remodeling of the production kitchen and nutrition centers; and remodel of the rehabilitation and therapy area, including replacement of equipment. A storage building will also be added. Capital construction expenditure limitation for this project is authorized through June 30, 2021.

$10.5 million of lottery bonds were authorized in the 2011-13 biennium and reauthorized in each subsequent biennium for a third veterans’ home in Roseburg. A U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs construction grant was not received in prior biennia to provide the remaining funding for the home. Additionally, analysis by the Department has not supported the facility maintaining necessary occupancy levels to operate at a sustainable level. Capital construction limitation established in 2011-13 for the Roseburg Veterans’ Home (HB 5006, 2011) expired on June 30, 2017. Limitation was re-established for a new six-year period in the 2017-19 budget and general obligation bonds were authorized to support funding for the home.

ODVA continues to evaluate the need for skilled nursing care in the Roseburg area, as well as explore a new veterans’ home model that would include assisted living and secure memory care.

Additionally, due to the shortage of nurses and medical technicians in the City of Roseburg and Douglas County that would be required to staff the Roseburg Veterans’ Home, ODVA was directed though a budget note to convene a rural medical training facilities workgroup.

The workgroup will investigate issues related to alleviating the shortage and include representatives from the City of Roseburg, Douglas County, local hospital or medical facilities, including the Roseburg VA Medical Center, and local medical practitioners with experience in training nursing and medical technician students. ODVA will report the results of the workgroup and recommendations to the Legislature by September 18, 2018.